Stitch Guides

Stitch Guides

Embroidery in all forms uses various combinations of stitches. Here's a few useful illustrations of various stitches for needlework.

Each hand embroidery stitch has a specific name to help identify it. These names will vary depending on the country and region. Some needlework books will include the various name of each stitch. Worked individually mostly stitches are simple to execute, however when you put them together the results can be extremely complex and beautiful.

Stitchery in every form has been studied and found to be at once relaxing and a challenge, and a great way to lower blood pressure and stress levels.

We hope you enjoy working these few basic stitches enough to move forward and make stitching a pleasant pastime for a lifetime!

Basic Cross Stitch

Work your stitches from left to right. Come up at A, go down at B, and emerge at C as you work from lower left to upper right, making a row of even slanted stitches. On the return "pass" work from lower right to upper left, overlaying the first stitches and forming an X.

Continued use of this Basic Cross Stitch method will help ensure that the top stitch on every stitch in the piece is facing the same direction, resulting in a smoother and better quality finished look.

Basic Cross Stitch

Basic Stem Stitch

Work this stitch from left to right. Mark a line the desired length of the stem stitch on your fabric. Come up at A and go down at B making a straight stitch along the designated line; then, emerge at C ( which is at the midpoint of the previous stitch) keeping the thread below the needle.

This stitch is often used as stemps and outlines, or is laid side by side in rows to be used as a filling stitch. Make sure to work rows in a snug fashion when using as a filler stitch.

Basic Stem Stitch

Basic Satin Stitch

Mark the shape as a guide for the stitches on your fabric. Come up at A and go down at B, making a straight stitch the desired length; then, emerge at C. Continue to work these straight stitches close together, keeping the edge of the design shaped even and defined. Don't cover too large of an area, or the stitches will lose their shape.

These stitches can be worked in single or double layers to create a thick, smooth blanket of stitching. A favorite among crewel artwork designers and Victorian crazy quilters.

Basic Satin Stitch

Back Stitch

Almost every stitchery project will utilize this stitch for an outline at some point. Easy and simple to do~ the trick is to keep your stitches even as you work.

Work your individual stitches from the right to left. Come up at A, take a small backward stitch, go down at B, and emerge at C. Always move the needle forward beneath the fabric and come up one stitch length ahead, ready to take another stitch. Make sure to keep your stitches even.

Back Stitch

Bosnian Stitch

Work the first row in even , vertical stitches, from right to left. Come up at A, go down at B, and emerge at C. On the return "pass" work the diaganol stitches from left to right, filling in the spaces.

Bosnian Stitch

Interwoven Cross Stitch Flower

This is an interwoven set of cross stitches which can be worked to make a beautiful cross stitch flower in varying sizes.

Come up at A and go down at B, making your straight stitch the desired length. Cross the stitch with a stitch of equal size ( C to D). Come up again at A and cross over to B. Come up again at C to start the next stitch, weaving your thread through the stitches. Continue weaving to make a larger decorative cross stitch flower.

Interwoven Cross Stitch Flower

Stacked Arrowhead Stitch

Come up at A, go down at B, and emerge at C. Backstitch at B and emerge at D. Continue until each arrowhead is completed. Make sure to keep the stitches spaced evenly.

For a leaf, mark the shape on your fabric as a guide for the stitches. Come up at A, go down at B, and emerge at C. Continue to work in this manner, keeping your stitches quite close and making the edge of your leaf defined.

Stacked Arrowhead Stitch

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